Flickr pays for the ability to upload NSFW photos – TechCrunch

0

Flickr isn’t great at making money, but as the old saying goes, sex sells. Thus, in an attempt to attract more paying subscribers, Flickr changed its content guidelines to only To allow Flickr Pro users can post “restricted” or “moderate” content, which includes photos of “frontal nudity and sex acts.”

Honestly, that’s not a bad decision – it might be more effective than asking subscribers to recruit their friends to pay Flickr.

When SmugMug acquired the photo hosting service in 2018, CEO Don MacAskill hoped to make the service profitable, calling it “the heart of the entire internet fabric”. But it wasn’t just hyperbolic CEO talk – MacAskill was right. Flickr is a historical archive. On the one hand, it presents real historical images, but it also tells a visual history of the world through the lens of millions of people since 2004. It would be sad if all of that went away.

But Flickr is very expensive to run because it hosts so much data on the internet. For a while, there was really no reason to pay for Flickr, since all users got a free terabyte of storage for their photos. But under SmugMug’s leadership, Flickr instituted a limit on the number of photos free users could store, reducing that terabyte of data to just 1,000 photos. Flickr also warned users that after a certain date their photos might be deleted. These major changes were implemented to encourage users to back up their personal archives by upgrading to a paid plan.

So far Flickr says it hasn’t actually deleted any downloads (thanks, Flickr, but also that means I wasted an afternoon in 2019 downloading zip files of everything I have never published). But it still doesn’t make any money, hence the pivot to invite NSFW downloads.

“Photographers who create and create work that might be considered risky by some will have a safe place online to interact with each other, share mutual interests, and put their art out into the world without fear of it being deleted or totally banned from the communities they love,” Flickr manager Alex Seville wrote in a post. blog post. “But we’ve been lax in defining a space for these photographers, so far.

In less sexy news, Flickr continues to limit what users can do with their free accounts. Today’s announcement also states that now free users can only post 50 non-public photos.

“We love being entrusted with your photos, but we love even more seeing them being discovered, added to groups and submitted to photo contests,” Seville explained. “We’ll never turn you down if you just want a safe place to store a lifetime’s footage, you’ll just need a Pro subscription to do that.”

Flickr says it will keep free users informed about how and when these updates will affect their accounts. But this market that Flickr is targeting to increase its subscription revenue is very specific: people who upload private photos (but no more than 1000) and NSFW photographers. Hopefully nude photography can save this slice of the internet.

Share.

Comments are closed.